In My Mailbox #2

In My Mailbox is a weekly meme hosted by The Story Siren. It’s where all participants post what new books they received in the mail, from the library, or contests they won, etc. Click the link for more info and to join in on the fun!

For review:

Softly & Tenderly, by Sara Evans and Rachel Hauck (from NetGalley)

Jade has moved from her past toward a bright future. But then the man she loves most destroys her trust. 

Jade Fitzgerald’s hope for a perfect marriage shatters when her husband confesses he has an illegitimate son. What’s more, he wants to raise the boy in their home.

Hurting and confused, Jade embarks on a road trip to Iowa to take her sick mother to her childhood home. In the comfort of the old homeplace, Jade struggles with her fears and the tug of her first love. With the help of her family and her faith, she comes to understand her future doesn’t rest on the power of her past, but in the goodness of God’s mercy.

E-books (from the library):

The Earth, My Butt And Other Big Round Things, by Carolyn Mackler

Fifteen-year-old Virginia Shreves has a larger-than-average body and a plus-size inferiority complex, especially when she compares herself to her slim, brilliant, picture-perfect family. But that’s before a shocking phone call — and a horrifying allegation — about her rugby-star brother changes everything. With irreverent humor and surprising gravity, Carolyn Mackler creates an endearingly blunt heroine who speaks to every teen who struggles with family expectations, and proves that the most impressive achievement is to be true to yourself.

The Last Letter From Your Lover, by Jojo Moyes

A sophisticated, page-turning double love story spanning forty years-an unforgettable Brief Encounter for our times. 

It is 1960. When Jennifer Stirling wakes up in the hospital, she can remember nothing-not the tragic car accident that put her there, not her husband, not even who she is. She feels like a stranger in her own life until she stumbles upon an impassioned letter, signed simply “B”, asking her to leave her husband.

Years later, in 2003, a journalist named Ellie discovers the same enigmatic letter in a forgotten file in her newspaper’s archives. She becomes obsessed by the story and hopeful that it can resurrect her faltering career. Perhaps if these lovers had a happy ending she will find one to her own complicated love life, too. Ellie’s search will rewrite history and help her see the truth about her own modern romance.

A spellbinding, intoxicating love story with a knockout ending, The Last Letter from Your Lover will appeal to the readers who have made One Day and The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Societybestsellers.

From the Library:

The Book of (Even More) Awesome, by Neil Pasricha

The next book in the number-one internationally bestselling franchise. 

In this follow-up to The Book of Awesome, Neil Pasricha looks at even more of the little things that make us smile every day.

Neil Pasricha is back with a collection of hundreds more awesome things from the website, as well as never-before-seen extraordinary moments that deserve celebration:

Entries include:

– When your windshield wipers match the beat of the song you’re listening to
– Letting go of the gas pump perfectly so you end on a round number
– When a baby falls asleep on you

Because couldn’t we all use a little more AWESOME?

The Book of Lost Things, by John Connolly

High in his attic bedroom, twelve-year-old David mourns the death of his mother, with only the books on his shelf for company. But those books have begun to whisper to him in the darkness. Angry and alone, he takes refuge in his imagination and soon finds that reality and fantasy have begun to meld. While his family falls apart around him, David is violently propelled into a world that is a strange reflection of his own — populated by heroes and monsters and ruled by a faded king who keeps his secrets in a mysterious book, The Book of Lost Things.

Taking readers on a vivid journey through the loss of innocence into adulthood and beyond, New York Times bestselling author John Connolly tells a dark and compelling tale that reminds us of the enduring power of stories in our lives.

The Namesake, by Jhumpa Lahiri

THE NAMESAKE follows the Ganguli family through its journey from Calcutta to Cambridge to the Boston suburbs. Ashima and Ashoke Ganguli arrive in America at the end of the 1960s, shortly after their arranged marriage in Calcutta, in order for Ashoke to finish his engineering degree at MIT. Ashoke is forward-thinking, ready to enter into American culture if not fully at least with an open mind. His young bride is far less malleable. Isolated, desperately missing her large family back in India, she will never be at peace with this new world.

Soon after they arrive in Cambridge, their first child is born, a boy. According to Indian custom, the child will be given two names: an official name, to be bestowed by the great-grandmother, and a pet name to be used only by family. But the letter from India with the child’s official name never arrives, and so the baby’s parents decide on a pet name to use for the time being. Ashoke chooses a name that has particular significance for him: on a train trip back in India several years earlier, he had been reading a short story collection by one of his most beloved Russian writers, Nikolai Gogol, when the train derailed in the middle of the night, killing almost all the sleeping passengers onboard. Ashoke had stayed awake to read his Gogol, and he believes the book saved his life. His child will be known, then, as Gogol.

Lahiri brings her enormous powers of description to her first novel, infusing scene after scene with profound emotional depth. Condensed and controlled, THE NAMESAKE covers three decades and crosses continents, all the while zooming in at very precise moments on telling detail, sensory richness, and finenuances of character.

About the Author: JHUMPA LAHIRI was born in 1967 in London, England and raised in Rhode Island. Her stories have been selected for both The Best American Short Stories and the O. Henry Award. Her collection of short stories, The Interpreter of Maladies, won both the Pen/Hemingway Award and the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2000. She lives in New York City.

BOUGHT:

Seriously … I’m Kidding, by Ellen DeGeneres

“Sometimes the greatest things are the most embarrassing.” Ellen Degeneres’ winning, upbeat candor has made her show one of the most popular, resilient and honored daytime shows on the air. (To date, it has won no fewer than 31 Emmys.) Seriously… I’m Kidding, Degeneres’ first book in eight years, brings us up to date about the life of a kindhearted woman who bowed out of American Idol because she didn’t want to be mean. Lively; hilarious; often sweetly poignant.

Matched, by Ally Condie

Cassia has always trusted the Society to make the right choices for her: what to read, what to watch, what to believe. So when Xander’s face appears on-screen at her Matching ceremony, Cassia knows with complete certainty that he is her ideal mate… until she sees Ky Markham’s face flash for an instant before the screen fades to black.

The Society tells her it’s a glitch, a rare malfunction, and that she should focus on the happy life she’s destined to lead with Xander. But Cassia can’t stop thinking about Ky, and as they slowly fall in love, Cassia begins to doubt the Society’s infallibility and is faced with an impossible choice: between Xander and Ky, between the only life she’s known and a path that no one else has dared to follow.

Deadly Appearances, by Gail Bowen (signed by the author!)

ON A HOT AUGUST AFTERNOON a picnic is being held to celebrate the election of Andy Boychuk as leader of Saskatchewan’s Official Opposition. All of the key people in Boychuk’s life—family, friends, enemies—have gathered. About to begin his speech, Boychuk takes a sip of water from a glass on the lectern. Within seconds he is dead.

Joanne Kilbourn, Boychuk’s speechwriter, is stunned, but she is no stranger to sudden death—her own husband was brutally murdered several years before. While trying to help Boychuk’s widow through the trauma, Joanne delves into his past, and unexpectedly enters a world of concealed passions and sexual intrigue. When someone tries to stop her, Joanne, an almost typical middle-aged woman, sets off to solve the case—her first on the way to becoming Canada’s pre-eminent reluctant sleuth.

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4 thoughts on “In My Mailbox #2

My home is where my books are. - Ellen Thompson

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