In My Mailbox #3

In My Mailbox is a weekly meme hosted by The Story Siren. It’s where all participants post what new books they received in the mail, from the library, or contests they won, etc. Click the link for more info and to join in on the fun!

WARNING: There are a LOT of books in my mailbox this week … just warnin’ y’all … 🙂

For review (from BookSneeze):

Heaven is for Real: A Little Boys Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Back, by Todd Burpo

A young boy emerges from life-saving surgery with remarkable stories of his visit to heaven.

Heaven Is for Real is the true story of the four-year old son of a small town Nebraska pastor who during emergency surgery slips from consciousness and enters heaven. He survives and begins talking about being able to look down and see the doctor operating and his dad praying in the waiting room. The family didn’t know what to believe but soon the evidence was clear.

Colton said he met his miscarried sister, whom no one had told him about, and his great grandfather who died 30 years before Colton was born, then shared impossible-to-know details about each. He describes the horse that only Jesus could ride, about how “reaaally big” God and his chair are, and how the Holy Spirit “shoots down power” from heaven to help us.

Told by the father, but often in Colton’s own words, the disarmingly simple message is heaven is a real place, Jesus really loves children, and be ready, there is a coming last battle.

Bought: 

  

The Iron King (Iron Fey #1), by Julie Kagawa

Meghan Chase has a secret destiny; one she could never have imagined.
Something has always felt slightly off in Meghan’s life, ever since her father disappeared before her eyes when she was six. She has never quite fit in at school or at home.
When a dark stranger begins watching her from afar, and her prankster best friend becomes strangely protective of her, Meghan senses that everything she’s known is about to change.
But she could never have guessed the truth – that she is the daughter of a mythical faery king and is a pawn in a deadly war. Now Meghan will learn just how far she’ll go to save someone she cares about, to stop a mysterious evil no faery creature dare face; and to find love with a young prince who might rather see her dead than let her touch his icy heart.

The Iron Daughter (Iron Fey #2), by Julie Kagawa

Half Summer faery princess, half human, Meghan has never fit in anywhere. Deserted by the Winter prince she thought loved her, she is prisoner to the Winter faery queen. As war looms between Summer and Winter, Meghan knows that the real danger comes from the Iron fey—ironbound faeries that only she and her absent prince have seen. But no one believes her.

Worse, Meghan’s own fey powers have been cut off. She’s stuck in Faery with only her wits for help. Trusting anyone would be foolish. Trusting a seeming traitor could be deadly. But even as she grows a backbone of iron, Meghan can’t help but hear the whispers of longing in her all-too-human heart.

The Iron Queen (Iron Fey #3), by Julie Kagawa

My name is Meghan Chase.

I thought it was over. That my time with the fey, the impossible choices I had to make, the sacrifices of those I loved, was behind me. But a storm is approaching, an army of Iron fey that will drag me back, kicking and screaming. Drag me away from the banished prince who’s sworn to stand by my side. Drag me into the core of conflict so powerful, I’m not sure anyone can survive it.

This time, there will be no turning back.

Past Midnight (Past Midnight #1), by Mara Pernhagen

Let me set the record straight. My name is Charlotte Silver and I’m not one of those paranormal-obsessed freaks you see on TV…no, those would be my parents, who have their own ghost-hunting reality show. And while I’m usually roped into the behind-the-scenes work, it turns out that I haven’t gone unnoticed. Something happened on my parents’ research trip in Charleston—and now I’m being stalked by some truly frightening other beings. Trying to fit into a new school and keeping my parents’ creepy occupation a secret from my friends—and potential boyfriends—is hard enough without having angry spirits whispering in my ear.

All I ever wanted was to be normal, but with ghosts of my past andpresent colliding, now I just want to make it out of high school alive…

 
Catching Fire (Hunger Games #2), by Suzanne Collins

Katniss Everdeen and Peeta Mellark won the annual competition described in Hunger Games, but the aftermath leaves these victors with no sense of triumph. Instead, they have become the poster boys for a rebellion that they never planned to lead. That new, unwanted status puts them in the bull’s-eye for merciless revenge by The Capitol. Catching Firemaintains the adrenaline rush of Suzanne Collins’s series launch.

Mockingjay (Hunger Games #3), by Suzanne Collins

Young Katniss Everdeen has survived the dreaded Hunger Games not once, but twice, but even now she can find no relief. In fact, the dangers seem to be escalating: President Snow has declared an all-out war on Katniss, her family, her friends, and all the oppressed people of District 12. The thrill-packed final installment of Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games trilogy will keep young hearts pounding.

Envy (Empty Coffin #1), by Gregg Olsen

Murder is such a dirty word…

New York Times bestselling adult true crime author Gregg Olsen makes his YA debut with EMPTY COFFIN, a gripping new fiction series for teens based on ripped-from-the-headlines stories…with a paranormal touch.

Crime lives–and dies–in the deceptively picture-perfect town of Port Gamble (aka “Empty Coffin”), Washington. Evil lurks and strange things happen–and 15-year-olds Hayley and Taylor Ryan secretly use their wits and their telepathic “twin-sense” to uncover the truth about the town’s victims and culprits.

Envy, the series debut, involves the mysterious death of the twins’ old friend, Katelyn. Was it murder? Suicide? An accident? Hayley and Taylor are determined to find out–and as they investigate, they stumble upon a dark truth that is far more disturbing than they ever could have imagined.

Based on the shocking true crime about cyber-bullying, Envy will take you to the edge–and push you right over.

The Goddess Test, by Aimee Carter

It’s always been just Kate and her mom—and her mother is dying. Her last wish? To move back to her childhood home. So Kate’s going to start at a new school with no friends, no other family and the fear her mother won’t live past the fall.

Then she meets Henry. Dark. Tortured. And mesmerizing. He claims to be Hades, god of the Underworld—and if she accepts his bargain, he’ll keep her mother alive while Kate tries to pass seven tests.

Kate is sure he’s crazy—until she sees him bring a girl back from the dead. Now saving her mother seems crazily possible. If she succeeds, she’ll become Henry’s future bride, and a goddess.

FROM $0.25 LIBRARY TABLE:

The Last Burp of Mac McGerp, by Pam Smallcomb

Fifth-grader Mac McGerp is the best burper in Withersberg. In fact, he’s a famous champion burper-he can even move objects with his burps! Mac and his best friend, Lido Katz, dream of someday owning the Burp and Surf shop in the Bahamas. But with the arrival of a new principal Mrs. Goodbody and her strict no burping rules, Mac nearly gets kicked out of school for his award-winning talent. And if he gets kicked out, Lido and Mac’s dreams may just go down the drain. Mac tries everything to get rid of Mrs. Goodbody, but in the end, it’s one big burp that does the trick. A hilarious story about friendship, perseverance, and good burping.

Lovingly Alice, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

There are good years and bad years for kids . . .

. . . and fifth grade is turning out to be a bad one for Alice. Her teacher, Mrs. Swick, never smiles. A good friend moves away. Her plan to find a stepmother is a total failure. And then something happens that’s so terrible it makes Alice mad at the entire world.

But then her brother, Lester, breaks his leg, and Alice discovers she feels much better when she stops feeling sorry for herself and starts helping him. The old Alice is back — just in time for the biggest surprise of all.

Club Meds, by Katherine Hall Page

Jack Sutton has been on meds since third grade, when his mother came to his classroom and discovered his teacher had put him in a washing machine box.

Jack and his friends refer to the nurse’s office, where they line up daily for their medications, as Club Meds. But Club Meds is no vacation spot — it’s what enables Jack and Mary, who have ADHD, and Sam, who suffers from epilepsy, to navigate the treacherous waters of Busby Memorial High School. So when major-league bully and Jack’s longtime nemesis Chuck forces Jack to turn over his Ritalin, Jack is once again in a box, one that’s far more frightening than a discarded packing carton.

The kids from Club Meds come to Jack’s defense with a plan that’s outrageous and dangerous, and a long shot at best. It will test their determination and their courage — and it will change their lives forever.

Hoot, by Carl Hiaasen

Carl Hiaasen, bestselling author of Basket Case and other hilarious Floridian capers, serves up a high-spirited fight for the environment in his first work aimed at younger audiences.

The site of Coconut Cove’s future Mother Paula’s All-American Pancake House is experiencing a slight problem: survey stakes removed, alligators in the port-a-potties, and painted-over patrol cars. But who’s behind the clever vandalism and pranks? New Florida resident Roy Eberhardt isn’t aware of these goings-on, but he has often noticed a barefoot boy running down the street faster than anything. His curiosity piqued, Roy starts to inquire around and even follows the boy once, only to be told by Beatrice Leep, a.k.a. Beatrice the Bear, to mind his own business. Despite Beatrice’s warning and plenty of bullying from the lunkheaded Dana Matherson, Roy follows the boy, whose name is Mullet Fingers, one day and winds up in the middle of an ecological mission to save a parliament of burrowing owls from being bulldozed.

Full of colorful, well-developed characters, Hoot is a quick-witted adventure that will keep readers hooked. With down-to-earth Roy, dumbfounded Officer Delinko, and construction site manager Curly — along with other head-shaking morons and uplifting heroes — the author delivers an appealing cast of characters that keep the plot twisting and turning until the highly charged ending. Another zany trip to the Sunshine State for Hiaasen fans, this rewarding ecological adventure should keep readers young and old hooting with laughter. Matt Warner

The Last Chance Texaco, by Brent Hartinger

The guy looked at me with a stare that would have frozen antifreeze.

“You the new groupie, huh?”

“Yeah,” I said. “So?”

“So no one wants you here. Why don’t you go back where you came from?”

I can’t go back, I wanted to say. That was the thing about living in a group home. There was nowhere for me to go but forward.

Brent Hartinger’s second novel, a portrait of a subculture of teenagers that many people would like to forget, is as powerful and provocative as his first book, Geography Club.

Into the Blue, by Andrea Curtis

Award-winning journalist Andrea Curtis explores the shadows cast over her family by a century-old shipwreck and uncovers the tragedy, disaster and promise of early life on the Great Lakes.

Every family has a story, passed down through generations. For Andrea Curtis that story is the wreck of the SS J.H. Jones. In 1906, the late-November swells of Georgian Bay erupt into a blinding storm, sinking the Jones and claiming the lives of all on board. Left in the wake is Captain Jim Crawford’s one-year-old daughter, Eleanor, who faces a daunting future of poverty and isolation.

But Eleanor emerges from her childhood determined to leave behind the restrictions of her small town. She plunges into the excitement of Jazz-era California and 1930s Montreal, struggling to become a poet and a writer. Almost a century later, Andrea knows her grandmother Eleanor only as a sophisticated, respected Montreal matriarch. Until, while researching Jim Crawford’s role in the Jones tragedy, she discovers that Eleanor had a hidden past.

Using family stories, archival research and fictionalized re-enactments, Andrea Curtis narrates her family’s history, and that of the place they once called home. Into the Blue shimmers with Curtis’s rich and reflective voice, recreating a little-known but formative time when Canadians persevered through unthinkable loss, violence and disaster, and brings to life a grand era of Great Lakes history. This is a worthy peer to such beloved memoirs as David Macfarlane’s The Danger Tree and Roy MacGregor’s A Life in the Bush.

FROM THE USED BOOKSTORE: 

     

Murder at the Mendel (A Joanne Kilbourn Mystery, #2), by Gail Bowen

As a child Joanne was friends with Sally Love and her parents, but the friendship languished after Sally’s father died and she moved away, eventually becoming a very controversial artist. When the Mendel Gallery opens an exhibition of Sally’s work, Joanne is eager to attend and to renew their friendship. But it’s not so easy being Sally’s friend anymore, and soon Joanne finds herself ensnared in a web of intrigue and violence. When the director of a local private gallery is brutally murdered, Joanne finds that the past she and Sally share was far more complicated, and far more sordid, than she had realized.

The Wandering Souls Murders (A Joanne Kilbourn Mystery, #3), by Gail Bowen

University instructor Joanne Kilbourn is horrified when her grown daughter Mieka finds the body of Bernice, a teenaged office cleaner, hanging out of a dumpster. Although it looks as though Bernice is another victim in a series of prostitute killings, significant details–including a teddy bear tattoo on the girl’s buttocks–persuade police that it is a copycat murder. Concurrently, Mieka prepares for her wedding and Jo’s son Peter is pursued by obsessive Christy Sinclair.

When Christy becomes an apparent suicide, Jo is surprised to find herself listed as Christy’s next of kin; then she learns that Christy also had a teddy bear tattoo. Investigating both deaths, Jo and her TV news director friend Jill run up against an unsavory secret being kept on an island in the northern Canadian woods. This poignant story exposes the danger that can hide in good intentions as Jo’s efforts uncover the surprising identity of a sex ring’s mastermind and put her young adopted daughter Taylor in danger.

A Colder Kind of Death (A Joanne Kilbourn Mystery, #4), by Gail Bowen

A Colder Kind of Death introduces Gail Bowen’s amateur detective Joanne Kilbourn in a most inventive and intriguing murder mystery debut. Fortysomething Joanne, single mom and university professor, still hasn’t quite come to terms with the murder of her husband when politician Andy Boychuk, a family friend and one of her husband’s closest colleagues, is murdered at a picnic celebrating his election as leader of his party. Even though there seem to be few other suspects, Kilbourn is determined to clear Boychuk’s wife, Eve, on whom all suspicions seem to be falling. But Joanne discovers that there are hidden secrets in Andy and Eve’s past that someone doesn’t want revealed, even if it means killing again.

A Killing Spring (A Joanne Kilbourn Mystery, #5), by Gail Bowen

Gail Bowen, winner of the 1995 Arthur Ellis Award for best crime novel for her last Joanne Kilbourn mystery, A Colder Kind of Death, is back – with her most daring mystery to date.

In the horrifying opening paragraph of A Killing Spring, Reed Gallagher, the head of the School of Journalism at the university where Joanne Kilbourn teaches, is found dead in a seedy rooming house. He is dressed in women’s lingerie, with an electric cord around his neck. Suicide, the police say. A clear case of accidental suicide. But for Joanne, who takes on the thankless task of breaking the news to Gallagher’s wife, this death is just the first in a series of misfortunes that rock her life, both professional and personal.

A few days after Gallagher’s death, the School of Journalism is vandalized – its offices and computers are trashed, and homophobic graffiti are sprayed everywhere. Then an unattractive and unpopular journalism student in Joanne’s politics class stops coming to school after complaining to an unbelieving Joanne that she’s being sexually harassed. Clearly, all is not as well at the university as Joanne had thought. Nor is all well in her love life after the casual racism of a stranger drives a wedge between Joanne and her lover, Inspector Alex Kequahtooway. To make matters worse, Joanne is unceremoniously fired by her best friend from the weekly political panel on Nationtv, which she’s being doing for years.

Badly shaken by these calamities, Joanne struggles to carry cheerfully on. Action, she knows, is better for her than moping. She decides to find out why her student has stopped coming to class, and in doing so, Joanne steps unknowingly into an on-campus world of fear and deceit and murder.

Burying Ariel (A Joanne Kilbourn Mystery, #6), by Gail Bowen

Joanne Kilbourn is looking forward to a relaxing weekend at the lake with her children and her new grandchild when murder once more wreaks havoc in Regina, Saskatchewan. A young colleague at the university where Joanne teaches is found stabbed to death in the basement of the library.

Ariel Warren was a popular lecturer among the students and staff, and her violent death shocks – and divides – Regina’s small and fractious academic community. Kevin Coyle, a professor earlier accused of sexual harassment, is convinced the murder is connected to his case, even as Ariel’s long-time lover, Charlie Dowhanuik, a radio talk-show host, seems to point the finger at himself in his on-air comments on the day of the murder.

Aghast at Charlie’s indiscretion, his father, Howard, asks his old friend Joanne for her help. But before Joanne has a chance to start searching for the truth, she is scorched by the white-hot anger of militant feminists on campus when a vigil for the dead woman turns ugly. Instead of a tribute to Ariel’s life, the vigil becomes an angry protest about violence against women. Some of the women there are certain they know who killed Ariel, and they are out for vengeance.

The everyday family problems and joys Joanne Kilbourn experiences as she solves baffling murder cases have endeared her to a growing number of fans, as have the television movies, starring Wendy Crewson as Joanne. The seventh novel in Gail Bowen’s much-loved series, Burying Ariel offers readers an imaginative, compassionate, and, above all, challenging mystery.

Verdict in Blood (A Joanne Kilbourn Mystery, #7), by Gail Bowen

Joanne Kilbourn is a 51-year-old professor of political science, broadcaster, mother, lover, and amateur crime solver based in Regina, Saskatchewan. She’s an original and immensely appealing character, totally believable in all her roles. In five previous installments, author Gail Bowen has supplied such a convincing array of details about her family, friends, and the landscape they inhabit that we slip into Joanne’s life as easily as knocking on a neighbor’s door.

The plot of this sixth book in the series is also strong on family and friends: when a tough judge, Justine Blackwell, suddenly softens up after 30 years on the bench and supports a prisoners’ rights group, attacks from her three angry daughters make her doubt her own mental competence. Judge Blackwell turns to an elderly teacher and mentor, Hilda McCourt, for advice. McCourt is staying with her friend Kilbourn when they both get the news that Judge Blackwell has been battered to death in a public park. A group of ex-prisoners who had been incarcerated by the judge seem to have reasons to want Blackwell dead, but so do the Lear-like daughters, especially a former rock star and a discredited psychiatrist.

Gossip Girl, by Cecily von Ziegesar

Welcome to New York City’s Upper East Side, where my friends and I live, go to school, play, and sleep–sometimes with each other.

S is back from boarding school, and if we aren’t careful, she’s going to win over our teachers, wear that dress we couldn’t fit into, steal our boyfriends’ hearts, and basically ruin our lives in a major way. I’ll be watching closely…

You know you love me,
gossip girl

FROM READERSERVICE: 

Moonlight Cover, by Sherryl Woods

Jess O’Brien has overcome a lot — the challenges of attention deficit disorder, the near bankruptcy of her beloved Inn at Eagle Point and her self-perception as a screwup in a family of overachievers. Now she’s ready to share the future with a man. Her friends persuade her to join a dating service — but she gets no takers! Which is fine with her childhood friend, psychologist Will Lincoln, who’s already chosen the perfect man for Jess: himself.

Will has loved Jess practically forever. He knows her faults and her strengths. But for all Will’s sincerity and charm, Jess fears he views her as some psychological case study. With her family and the town of Chesapeake Shores behind him, Will finally makes his case. But is it enough to convince Jess to take the risk of a lifetime?

The Heart of Winter, by Maggie Shayne, Linda Winstead Jones, Day LeClaire

This trio of irresistible stories from New York Times and USA TODAYbestselling author Maggie Shayne and USA TODAY bestselling authors Linda Winstead Jones and Day Leclaire touch the heart of who we are and what we desire….

Prepare to be…

Tempted

Melinda Terwilliger is a mild-mannered teacher—until she accidentally becomes The Toughest Girl in Town. But she meets her match in an undercover cop determined to get to know the real Melinda…with kisses hot enough to melt any woman’s heart!

Sediced

When law secretary Nell Rose is snowbound with a handsome stranger, keeping her New Year’s Resolution becomes nearly impossible. Why swear off men when a romantic weekend with a reclusive writer seems to be the ideal way to ring in the new year?

Swept Away

Plain Jayne Myleston seduced her office crush at a masked ball—and then found she’d turned up the heat with the wrong man! Even after the ball, she can’t say no to her Mystery Lover. That is, until Jayne finds out who he really is!

FROM THE LIBRARY: 

Harbor, by John A. Lindqvist

From the author of the international and New York Times bestseller Let the Right One In (Let Me In) comes this stunning and terrifying book which begins when a man’s six-year-old daughter vanishes.One ordinary winter afternoon on a snowy island, Anders and Cecilia take their six-year-old daughter Maja across the ice to visit the lighthouse in the middle of the frozen channel. While the couple explore the lighthouse, Maja disappears — either into thin air or under thin ice — leaving not even a footprint in the snow. Two years later, alone and more or less permanently drunk, Anders returns to the island to regroup. He slowly realises that people are not telling him all they know; even his own mother, it seems, is keeping secrets. What is happening in Domaro, and what power does the sea have over the town’s inhabitants?

As he did with Let the Right One In and Handling the Undead, John Ajvide Lindqvist serves up a blockbuster cocktail of suspense in a narrative that barely pauses for breath.

The Keep, by Jennifer Egan (for book club)

Jennifer Egan grabbed our attention with her 2001 National Book Award finalist, Look at Me, a darkly fascinating novel that intertwined the stories of two troubled women named Charlotte. In this chilling follow-up — a deft mix of psychological suspense, unconventional romance, and eerie allegory — Egan hones the interlocking-tales device to razor-edged perfection. One story takes place in an ancient European castle, the other in a 21st-century prison; but at their intersection lies a third tale more haunting and disturbing still. This spellbinding novel kept us glued to the page right up to its haunting, unforgettable conclusion.

Between, by Jessica Warman

Elizabeth Valchar—pretty, popular, and perfect—wakes up the morning after her eighteenth birthday party on her family’s yacht, where she’d been celebrating with her six closest friends. A persistent thumping noise has roused her. When she goes to investigate, what she finds will change everything she thought she knew about her life, her friends, and what lies in between. As Liz begins to unravel the circumstances surrounding her birthday night, she will find that no one around her, least of all Liz herself, was perfect—or innocent.
Critically acclaimed author Jessica Warman brings readers along on a roller-coaster ride of a mystery, one that is also a heartbreaking character study, a touching romance, and ultimately a hopeful tale of redemption, love, and letting go.

Before I Go To Sleep, by S. J. Watson

‘As I sleep, my mind will erase everything I did today. I will wake up tomorrow as I did this morning. Thinking I’m still a child. Thinking I have a whole lifetime of choice ahead of me …’ Memories define us. So what if you lost yours every time you went to sleep? Your name, your identity, your past, even the people you love – all forgotten overnight. And the one person you trust may only be telling you half the story. Welcome to Christine’s life.

13 thoughts on “In My Mailbox #3

  1. You have an epic mailbox this week and scored lots of great deals and library finds! I love the Iron Fey & Hunger Games series, as well as Past Midnight and Envy.
    Have a great week & enjoy all your new reads.

  2. Thanks for stopping by my IMM, you really do have a lot of books there. Some I have read-Iron Fey, Hunger Games, Past Midnight.
    Some I have not heard of but will be taking a closer look at them. 😀

  3. So. Many. Books. I would be tempted just to sit on the floor surrounded by them and cuddle one at a time!

    I’m so interested in Into the Blue – anything Great Lakes related is awesome in my eyes. I’ll have to buy a copy soon….next time I go to the cottage since it’s apparently not released in the US!

    • Into the Blue looked like a great book! Definitely a good $0.25 find at the library … and to think I just found out about that table. Must keep money with me whenever I go there now …

My home is where my books are. - Ellen Thompson

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