[Challenge] Joining The Classics Club!

Update – March 31, 2018

So I know I just joined The Classics Club only 4 months ago, but in that four months I’ve acquired SO MANY new classics for my shelves (or old classics?) and I just had to change my list to reflect that since I have WELL OVER 100 unread classics on my shelves and I thought to myself, “Why not just change my club list so that the classics I read actually count toward it?”

And here we are.

Originally, my plan was to finish my list of 50 by December 31, 2019, but I’m going to change that now to reflect the 5-years that most people use and finish this list by December 1, 2022.

This list doesn’t reflect everything I own, since I do own a lot of Penguin Little Black Classics, and I didn’t list every single Dickens book I own, AND I also wrote down some of my wishlist books that I want to read, too.

Here’s the updated list: 

  1. Mariana by Monica Dickens
  2. Hungry Hill by Daphne du Maurier
  3. Beloved by Toni Morrison
  4. Someone At A Distance by Dorothy Whipple
  5. Our Mutual Friend by Charles Dickens
  6. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
  7. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte – read 02/18/18
  8. Kitchen Essays by Agnes Jekyll
  9. O Pioneer! by Willa Cather
  10. The Sea The Sea by Iris Murdoch
  11. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens – read 12/20/17
  12. Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell
  13. The Making of a Marchioness by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  14. Villette by Charlotte Bronte
  15. David Golder by Irene Nemirovsky
  16. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie – read 01/20/18
  17. Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
  18. A Long Fatal Love Chase by Louisa May Alcott
  19. Shirley by Charlotte Bronte
  20. Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day by Winifred Watson – read 02/04/18
  21. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
  22. The Inheritance by Louisa May Alcott
  23. Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell
  24. Daphnes and Chloe by Longus – read 01/28/18
  25. The Winter of Our Discontent by John Steinbeck
  26. The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood
  27. East Lynne by Ellen Wood
  28. Animal Farm by George Orwell – read 01/24/18
  29. The Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood
  30. The Scapegoat by Daphne du Maurier
  31. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury – read 01/20/18
  32. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  33. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
  34. My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier – read 05/04/18
  35. East of Eden by John Steinbeck
  36. The Headmistress by Angela Thirkell
  37. Murder at the Vicarage by Agatha Christie – read 01/17/18
  38. Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
  39. Dead Souls by Nikolay Gogol
  40. The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton
  41. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  42. Emma by Jane Austen
  43. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  44. Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
  45. A Room With A View by E. M. Forster
  46. Love and Friendship by Jane Austen
  47. The Princess Bride by William Goldman – read 02/03/18
  48. The Day of the Triffids by John Whyndam
  49. North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell
  50. Sons by Pearl S. Buck
  51. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier – read 12/30/17
  52. Chocky by John Whyndam – read 06/03/18
  53. The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
  54. A Bridge for Passing by Pearl S. Buck
  55. The Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy
  56. Therese Raquin by Emile Zola
  57. Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
  58. Persuasion by Jane Austen
  59. A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway
  60. The Master and Margerita by Mikhail Bulgakov
  61. Tess of the D’Ubervilles by Thomas Hardy
  62. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte
  63. The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
  64. The Ivy Tree by Mary Stewart
  65. The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
  66. The Diary of a Provincial Lady by E. M. Delafield
  67. We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson – read 08/06/18
  68. Mary Barton by Elizabeth Gaskell
  69. Nine Coaches Waiting by Mary Stewart
  70. The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens
  71. The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
  72. Germinal by Emile Zola
  73. My Brother Michael by Mary Stewart
  74. The Gambler & A Nasty Business by Fyoder Dostoevsky
  75. Daisy Miller and Washington Square by Henry James
  76. The Blue Castle by L. M. Montgomery
  77. The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien
  78. I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith
  79. Obasan by Joy Kagawa
  80. Bleak House by Charles Dickens
  81. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  82. Dombie and Son by Charles Dickens
  83. Cider With Rosie by Laurie Lee
  84. Middlemarch by George Eliot
  85. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  86. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas
  87. How Green Was My Valley by Richard Llewellyn
  88. The Heart is A Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers – read 05/17/18
  89. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
  90. Not After Midnight by Daphne du Maurier
  91. Cakes and Ale by W. Somerset Maugham
  92. Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  93. Vile Bodies by Evelyn Waugh
  94. Frenchman’s Creek by Daphne du Maurier
  95. Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham
  96. Othello by William Shakespeare
  97. The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
  98. Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier
  99. Gone With The Wind by Margaret Mitchell
  100. The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

Alternates

  1. Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
  2. Stoner by John Williams

Whew! That was kind of exhausting to type all of that out, BUT I feel super excited again about reading a lot of these titles. Obviously I’d love to finish in less than 5 years, but even if it takes the full 5 years, I think one thing is certain – I need ot get reading!

Original Post – November 29, 2017

If you’ve been following my blog during this latter part of the year, you may have seen me talk about my thoughts about the books I’ve been reading lately and how I’ve felt almost underwhelmed by a lot of books that I’ve read. Because of that, I decided that I wanted to go back to reading more classics!

I was a big classics lover in university where I was an English minor. I wanted to take every course that had me reading more classics and I loved getting to read them. As time went by, I got more into music (which was my major) and reading kind of fell by the wayside. When I did read, I would read a lot of chick lit or just random books that looked good to me but I wasn’t reading very much at all.

In 2008 I started to get back into reading (don’t judge me, but Twilight was a contributor to that) and started blogging about reading. Eventually I started reading a LOT but was reading a lot of YA. Now, after having two kids and having considerably less time to read, I’ve realized that I want to read more books that leave a lasting effect, books that are written well, and books that will still be around in another 50 years. In other words, classic literature.

Obviously I’m not going to give up reading books that are newly released year after year, but I want to incorporate more classics into my reading. So that’s why I want to join the Classics Club! I figure it would be great motivation to knock off a lot of the books I’ve been wanting to read – and get to know a group of people who love reading the same kinds of literature.

Here are the rules for the Classics Club challenge from the official FAQ

  • choose 50+ classics
  • list them at your blog
  • choose a reading completion goal date up to five years in the future and note that date on your classics list of 50+ titles
  • e-mail the moderators of the blog (theclassicsclubblog@gmail.com) with your list link and information and it will be posted on the Members Page!
  • write about each title on your list as you finish reading it, and link it to your main list
  • when you’ve written about every single title, let us know!

So, my start date for joining will be December 1st, 2017 and I’m hoping to complete this list in TWO years, by December 31st, 2019.

Here’s my list of books!

  1. Emma by Jane Austen
  2. Persuasion by Jane Austen
  3. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
  4. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  5. Villette by Charlotte Bronte
  6. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte (Review coming soon!)
  7. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte
  8. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens (Review)
  9. The Princess Bride by William Goldman (Review)
  10. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier (Review)
  11. Gone With The Wind by Margaret Mitchell
  12. A Tree Grows In Brooklyn by Betty Smith
  13. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas
  14. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie (Review)
  15. Kitchen Essays by Agnes Jekyll
  16. Miss Pettigrew Lives For A Day by Winifred Watson (Review)
  17. Someone At A Distance by Dorothy Whipple
  18. The Day of The Triffids by John Wyndham
  19. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  20. Tess of the D’Ubervilles by Thomas Hardy
  21. The Beautifull Cassandra by Jane Austen
  22. The Great Fire of London by Samuel Pepys
  23. The Night Is Darkening Around Me by Emily Bronte
  24. Hannibal by Livy
  25. Daphnes and Chloe by Longus (Review)
  26. Green Tea by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu
  27. Lady Susan by Jane Austen
  28. Animal Farm by George Orwell (Review)
  29. Love And Friendship by Jane Austen
  30. Shirley by Charlotte Bronte
  31. How Green Was My Valley by Richard Llewellyn
  32. North And South by Elizabeth Gaskell
  33. A Room With a View by E. M. Forster
  34. We Have Always Lived In The Castle by Shirley Jackson
  35. The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
  36. Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell
  37. Far From The Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
  38. The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
  39. Fahrenheit 451 by Richard Bradbury (Review)
  40. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  41. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  42. Wives and Daughters by Elizabeth Gaskell
  43. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  44. Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
  45. The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton
  46. Murder at the Vicarage by Agatha Christie (Review)
  47. If On A Winter’s Night a Traveler by Italo Calvino
  48. The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood
  49. The Color Purple by Alice Walker
  50. Beloved by Toni Morrison

Alternates

  • A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  • Stoner by John Williams
  • The Turn Of The Screw by Henry James
  • Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
  • The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje

Have you joined The Classics Club? What are some classics you’re determined to read in the coming years? 

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11 thoughts on “[Challenge] Joining The Classics Club!

  1. I love classics, I’ve read Moby Dick and loved Great Expectations by Charles Dickens as well as Anna Karenina by Tolstoy. I’m currently reading Gone with the Wind by margaret mitchell, War and Peace by Tolstoy, and Dead Sould by Gogol. One of the tbings on my bucket list is to read all the classics. A tale of two Cities by Dickens is also good, however, I liked Great Expectations better. (As well as more current books) I didn’t know there was a Classics club, I may join it. Thank you for telling us about it.

  2. Reading the classics is always going to be a battle for me. I can’t see myself ever giving up on the pursuit, but it’s pretty rare for me to love a classic. If it was written before 1950, I typically have a hard time with it. Not in terms of difficulty, but just in general tone/theme/vibe/language/etc. Which is why I’ve basically created my own challenge: https://anotherbook.blog/another100books/

    Good luck with your list, though!

    Are there any on your list you’re particularly wary of? Which ones are you most excited for?

  3. As a recent English graduate, I love to hear when people are interested in reading more classics! You obviously had the opportunity of reading and studying some of the novels in your academics, which introduced you to a whole new reading experience (at least for me that’s how I grasped the classics). Over the years I have come to appreciate classic literature, as I too realized that I wanted well written stories to have a lasting effect on me. I have read quite a few books from your list- here are a few I would recommend giving a go at first! Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights is one of my favorite stories of all times- it will rip your heart out but you’ll still love it, Frankenstein by Mary Shelly is nothing like the cartoons (way better too) and Lord of the Flies will bring you on a wild adventure while stranded on an island with a bunch of little boys. There are so many great classics on your list and I wish you the best of luck! Don’t give up, happy reading!

  4. Welcome aboard – my first was due to be finished a couple of months ago, but I still have over a third to go….I could be finishing with you at this rate 😊

  5. Pingback: A question, some thoughts on Scarlett O’Hara, & The Classics Club Fifty Question Survey. – In Her Books

  6. Pingback: The Classics Club: 50 Question Survey! | Reading In Winter

My home is where my books are. - Ellen Thompson

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